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Category Archives: Managed Services

AfricaCom 2017: A Subexian View

It is a well-known fact that AfricaCom is one of the most popular and significant events for telecom operators and vendors alike in one of the most fast-paced emerging economies: Africa. The annual event is attended by the top telecom executives from across the world and is attended by Subex every year. I had the privilege of attending the last edition of AfricaCom, and from what I’m told, 2017 was one of AfricaCom’s busiest years: a sentiment which was shared by executives of operators and vendors and even by the Cape Town locals.

While I happened to attend some of the sessions at the newly opened Innovation Stage, my sense was that most of the buzz was happening at the exhibition area, where Subex too was an exhibitor among some of the biggest names in the telecom space. It was clear that Digital Transformation was the central theme of AfricaCom 2017, and was a key discussion point among both vendors and operators.

The theme of Digital Transformation and Digitalisation has been a cornerstone of Subex over the last few years and keeping in line with the concept, Subex showcased its Analytics and Consulting & Managed Services offerings to the delegates besides its renowned flagship products. In my discussion with executives from the top CSPs, it’s clear that analytics is still as popular as ever, and the demand from true analytical services for the telecom domain is hotter than ever.

The need to leverage data was also a hot discussion point for Subex even with industry analysts. As per my discussion with a renowned analyst from Ovum, leveraging analytics in the African market is definitely an area of interest.

Overall, from the excitement in the market for things to come, it’s clear that the African market is increasingly embracing the journey ahead and preparing themselves for the challenges on the horizon. It will be exciting to see how the market evolves over the course of the next year, and this thought makes the next edition of AfricaCom an exciting one.

I am hoping to come back again to experience the next wave of transformation that the industry undertakes and visit the wind of change I experienced at the Cape of Good Hope!

Sandeep is responsible for Product Marketing of Subex’s Analytics portfolio. In addition to this role, he also looks after Public Relations and Analyst Relations for the company. He comes in with 9 years’ experience in the Marketing domain.

Key is to ask the ‘right questions’

“In school, we’re rewarded for having the answer, not for asking a good question”

This quote from Richard Saul Wurman rightly describes how a normal human mind, as part of it’s social development process, adapts to the guidelines of “finding the answers”, rather than exploring the possibilities of asking the “right questions”.

And this mindset also reflects in our place of work. We are humanly tailored to explore satisfaction in having answers to all the questions. And in the process of being ‘answer ready’, we tend to become left brain heavy than the right. We become target driven and focus less and less on fresh set of questions which could challenge us further to drive improvement and innovation.

Fraud Management ‘function’ is no different. Being a ‘revenue protection’ function in a large ‘organization’ it is expected to act similar to a small, but important organ in human body.
Like hormone levels of an organ, health of an FM function is also measured in terms of subjective financial targets – either monthly, quarterly or yearly. And the corrective action starts when the achievements are found to be ‘less than optimum’.

But, as an experienced doctor would say – It’s the lifestyle you need to keep in check and not hormone levels to remain healthy!
Constant self-assessing questions such as – “Am I eating right ?”, “Am I sleeping right ?”, “Am I sitting right ?”, “Am I exercising right ?” etc. go a long way in guaranteeing you a healthy life. Periodic check-ups then becomes a method to confirm your good health rather than just means to detect illness or deficiencies.

Keeping healthy is a continuous process – be it human body or fraud management. It is actually a practice, than just a function.
And to setup a continuously improving fraud practice in your organization it is essential to keep asking relevant & timely questions across the following 8 pillars of this practice:

  • Influence
  • Organization
  • People
  • Process
  • Tools
  • Knowledge Management
  • Coverage
  • Continuous Improvement

While the questions could be an organization, risk or region specific, I personally always start with the following:

Influence:

  • Is our FM function on a driver seat or secondary role and working as a support function ?
  • How should we enhance the influence of our FM function ?
  • How do we keep showcasing enhanced value from FM function ?
  • How do we extend our internal & external interfacing and make the existing interfacing stronger ?

Organization:

  • How do we ensure fraud awareness keeps pace with the upgrading business dynamics ?
  • How do we enhance internal & external collaboration with FM function ?
  • How do we get higher return of investment from FM function ?
  • How to further reduce the fraud impact on the bottom line ?
  • How to make our fraud management practice more proactive ?

People:

  • Is resource acquisition better or resource development ?
  • How do we safeguard ourselves from attrition ?
  • Is our team structure agile enough while following industry standards ?
  • Do we have all the required roles and are the responsibilities clearly defined ?
  • Are we right, under or over staffed ?

Process:

  • Are my processes effective and easily exercisable ?
  • Are my processes future ready ?
  • Are my processes agile enough to adapt to any changes with acceptable TAT ?
  • Are we adopting and implementing industry best practices ?
  • What parts of my processes can be automated ?

Tools:

  • Is the Fraud Management tool adapted to my business environment ?
  • How do I ensure that the FM tool is fed accurate, complete and timely data ?
  • Are my fraud controls effective & efficient ? How do I reduce false positives ?
  • How do I ensure 100% automated fraud risk coverage ?
  • What capabilities do we need to acquire on tool front to be future ready ?
  • Are we ready against enormous data surge likely to be seen over next few years ? How do we benefit from it ?
  • Are we constantly learning from the industry in terms of fraud detection & prevention methods ?

Knowledge Management:

  • Is there sufficient attention on upgrading to the required skill sets ?
  • How do we enhance resource competency & knowledge against current & future services ?
  • Is our team keeping pace with constant fraud mutations ?
  • Is our team using the tools effectively & efficiently ?
  • Is our team knowledgeable and comfortable with processes ?
  • What are the top 5 areas of learning for the whole fraud function ?

Coverage:

  • Are we aware of all the fraud risks we are exposed to ? What is our current coverage levels ?
  • Do we know the gaps in terms of fraud risks coverage ? How can we improve ?
  • What is our strategy to become compliant to fraud risks introduced by new products and services ?
  • Are we ready for fast converging cross industry environment and the risks it introduces ?
  • What is our stand on customer and partner only risks ? How relevant they are for our business ? Is our current stand obsolete ?

Continuous Improvement:

  • What is our performance management strategy ?
  • Do we have effective KPIs ? Are these business relevant ?
  • How can we improve the fraud function’s effectiveness & maturity continuously ?
  • What metrics should I use to measure health of the overall FM function ?
  • Are we conducting sufficient & periodic RCA & decision analysis ?
  • How do we gather accumulated wisdom & actionable intelligence for improvement ?

Each of these questions can be a healthy point of discussion within your organization.
While these may give you a first hand view of health of your current fraud practice, more importantly, it may also open doors for a much detailed open table introspective sessions, enabling you to come up with much better & effective questions.

Remember, the key to remain healthy is to keep asking the ‘right’ questions.

As Albert Einstein rightly said – “If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”

Abhijeet Singh

Abhijeet is currently working as Principal Consultant with Subex.

He specializes in Telecom Fraud Management and his 360 degree experience in this field includes extensive exposure in Fraud Operations Management, Consulting & Advisory, Risk & Health Assessments, Business Development – Product & Managed Services and Analytics.

Out of professional life, he is a blogger, tech enthusiast and a traveler.

Mobile data offloading & Revenue Assurance

Emergence of mobile data offloading

Though mobile data offloading is not new to the industry it is catching steam off late and that has made operators around the world take notice. The factors that are driving mobile data offloading is the ever growing smart phone market giving people the option of streaming any content of the internet right on to the palm of their hands.

Surprisingly it is not “work on the move” that is making a large percentage of the populace download content through their smart phones extensively but the driving factor happens to be  streaming of video content from sites such as YouTube that ranks at the top of data usage .

Key industries can’t afford to ignore the trend especially when recent industry research predicts that nearly 50-60% of the data would be offloaded by the year 2017 by either WiFi, WiMax or Small cells with WiFi being a major player over the latter two.

Why offload with begin with?

At a time when cellular operator costs are going up due to investments in 3G and 4G network evolution, WiFi still ranks at the top for data offloading primarily due to 3G/4G pricing, poor signal reception indoors and WiFi’s higher bandwidths offerings with little or no interference.

The three factors put together are the leading cause for smart phone / tablet data usage being offloaded to a WiFi network.

A simple iPad sales figures of 2012 provides a interesting insight into the fact that 9 out of 10 iPads are only WiFi show casing a interesting find that cellular data services has been given a miss at the highly sought iPad retail market itself

“A little known fact is that contrary to popular belief a smart phone / tablet also uses lesser battery when connected to a WiFi network accounted due to the lower signal strength requirement.”

The benefactors

Apart from the end users who get excellent bandwidth, speed and zero interference reception; the businesses which provide broadband services to end users cash in by filling in the gaps between the cell towers, literally.

A few OPCOs in the wireless business who also double up by providing broadband services in the form of ADSL or FOC loop back their users into their network business.

How can RA help?

Analytics, analytics, analytics!!!

“The true potential of analytics is only limited by ones own imagination of what can be done with an array of data at your disposal”

Here RA’s primary role comes in as a revenue enhancer or opportunity loss identifier and not as the more commonly known roles of “leakage identification”.

From an RA perspective looping in key information of users such as the data usage pattern over cellular and WiFi and overlaying them over various dimensions of demographics, content, customer categorization and lifestyle components will provide an insight on potential cellular onload or offload opportunities which can be monetized by provision value add or add on services to potential users.

From an operators perspective this insight can increase revenues especially in regions where a good smart phone markets show below par cellular data usage therein operators can increasing their service offerings to targeted localities and users in the form small cells, WiFi, or  WiMax.

Srikanth Vasudevan

Srikanth is a Senior Consultant in Subex’s Business & Solutions Consulting vertical, focusing on Emerging Markets. He has over 9+ years of experience in consulting and advisory in the telecom industry with key focus on Revenue & Cost Assurance, Information Security, Governance Risk and Compliance. His client portfolio includes Aircel, MTNL, Tata Communications, Videocon, DST and PGi in APAC; STC, MTN, BTC in EMEA; Verizon, XO, Fairpoint and AT&T in NA.

The Dark Side of the Moon

In discussing the 1969 Apollo Moon landing, Neil Armstrong once said “We tried very hard not to be overconfident, because when you get overconfident, that’s when something snaps up and bites you”.

Apart from the occasional lack of atmosphere, the overlap between being a Fraud Manager and being an Astronaut isn’t that obvious. However, the dangers of being overconfident very much apply to both roles and it is essential that a Fraud Manager never sits still and assumes that all risks are covered.

The life of a Fraud team is always hectic and it can be very difficult just to keep on top of all the alarms, reports and referrals coming your way. Finding time to take a step back and look at the full spectrum of fraud risks is not a luxury that many, if any, Fraud Managers have at their disposal.

Common fraud types such as Subscription Fraud, Bypass, IRSF and PBX Hacking generate a huge number of cases and can be difficult to investigate and take preventative action against. In fact, just those 4 fraud types alone keep many Fraud teams more than busy throughout the week.

This is quite understandable given the losses associated with these frauds. However, when you consider that there are more than 40 fraud types listed in the GSMA FF Manual, the potential for a Fraud team to end up exposed to some significant risks is clear.

Furthermore, it’s not just the fraud types which are not addressed that can present a problem. There is also the risk that one of your core frauds mutates and leaves you blindsided. If we take the example of Subscription Fraud, there are so many variants that it can be very difficult to keep track and ensure that you have the appropriate prevention and detection in place.

Insight is what you need to avoid major fraud risks being left on ‘The Dark Side of the Moon’.

One of the many benefits of Subex Insight is that it includes tools that help Fraud Managers to identify fraud risk areas that are not covered or where gaps exist in existing coverage. The highly flexible nature of Insight allows it to identify both high level risks (e.g. whole fraud types which are not addressed) and lower level issues (e.g.  Individual Fraud Analysts who are not working specific types of alarms).

Subex Insight will provide the confidence you need to get you covered.

To get more information about Subex Insight please click here.

Morgan Ramsey

Business Consultant– Morgan has 12 years’ experience of fraud management in the telecommunications industry. Starting as a Fraud Analyst in the fixed-line environment, he worked for GTS and Primus before moving to Vodafone where he spent 6 years working in a number of roles covering fraud management, information security, new product risk and investigations. Whilst initially based in the UK, Morgan moved to Vodafone Group and worked across 16 locations globally. After leaving Vodafone, Morgan spent 2 years working as Senior Fraud Manager and an Investigations Consultant at CPW Group in the UK. Morgan joined Subex in March 2011 and works as a Business Consultant, specialising in fraud.

There’s No Business Like “Know” Business!!

People of a certain “vintage” will remember well the speech by former US Secretary of Defence, Donald Rumsfeld when questioned on the lack of evidence linking the Iraqi government with the supply of chemical weapons to terrorists. For many of us it took a second hearing to fully appreciate the difference between our “known knowns” and our “known unknowns”, and if you are anything like me then the concept of ‘unknown unknowns’ – well that took a little bit longer!

The speech has been the source of much discussion through the years and the basic principle has been applied to many situations and domains, including Fraud Management.  However, one of the most interesting parts of the speech has largely been overlooked in all of the focus on the “knowns” and “unknowns”. In responding to the question Rumsfeld’s first sentence was;
“Reports that say that something hasn’t happened are always interesting to me”.

Fraud management, as with most other operational functions, is largely focused on something happening, whether that is in relation to configuring rules in the Fraud Management System or in working out the effectiveness of your business function (people &  process). The emergence of certain fraud types through the years has started us on the track of reaping the benefits from looking at things that have not happened as a detection method but for many organizations the principle has not been fully embraced.

Most organizations are now looking into more detailed analytics, but within these analytics programs, how much emphasis is put on things that didn’t happen?  Additionally, in a dynamic environment such as Telecoms Fraud Management even what we “think” we know (“known knowns”) may be rapidly out-dated or superseded.

In the “Big Data” era things are likely to be even more challenging for Fraud Professionals as the haystack just got a lot bigger, so even trying to keep on top of what we think we know is going to be a challenge. To start trying to uncover our “Known Unknowns” and “Unknown unknowns”,  – that will take INSIGHT.

To get more information about Subex Insight please click here.

John Richardson

Product Manager for Fraud & Credit Risk Products in Subex. – John has more than 35 years’ experience in the telecoms industry working in a variety of different roles and activities from engineering to Product Management via Project Management, Marketing, Programme Management, Presales and more….
He is a well-respected Subject Matter Expert in the area of fraud management and operations with a wealth of experience to draw on.
John is also a qualified Project Manager with accreditation from International Project Management Association (IPMA) and is an active participant in the Telecommunications UK Fraud Forum (www.tuff.co.uk) – having been accredited by TUFF with Distinction as a Telecommunications Fraud Professional.

Hindsight – the Superpower everybody possesses?

As a child, I dreamed of having a superpower. Invisibility, flying, incredible strength, teleporting – any would have been just fine, I wasn’t choosy! Unfortunately it didn’t take too long for me to realise I was not ‘on the list’ so I went to work for BT instead and started on the road to a career in Fraud Management!

Over 25 years later it suddenly became clear to me, as I watched events unfold in Brazil over the last two weeks, that I may have been wrong all along.  In fact I DID have a superpower. I was, in fact, “Hindsight Man”! Unfortunately my hindsight powers did seem to have limitations in that they only worked in connection with the performance of the England Football (Soccer) team – but you have to start somewhere! However, once I realised I may possess this power I quickly noticed that nearly everyone else I came into contact with also seemed to be blessed with this ability – and it is always completely accurate (20:20), right? A pretty useful Superpower for a fraud professional then!

Before investing in the cape and mask, I decided to do some further research on the subject of Hindsight.  So, what is hindsight?  It is defined as ‘the ability to understand, after something has happened, what should have been done or what caused the event’. As I delved deeper, I realised that I, as with many others, am most likely suffering from something psychologists call Hindsight Bias…. also known as the ‘Knew-it-all-along effect’.

It appears we humans have a tendency to suggest predictability even in events where there is little or no evidence to support the prediction prior to the event. Unfortunately, it gets worse….even where some evidence may be present in order to validate our ‘Hindsight’ we may change our recollections to support newly provided information. The level of memory distortion this involves is not just affected by whether there is a positive or negative outcome, but also the severity of the negative outcome. Dangerous Stuff!

So it looks like I may not possess the power of hindsight after all and looking at it from a Fraud Management perspective that may be a good thing. Hindsight, as we have seen, can be based on no factual evidence and, even where there is some basis in fact, is prone to a significant number of external factors that can have a hugely negative impact on our assessment/judgement.

No, it’s clear to me now, to be a better fraud professional I don’t need Hindsight – I need Insight!

Read about Subex Insight here.

Will Richards

Head of Fraud Practice – Americas – Will Richards has worked in the telecommunications sector for 25 years, specialising in fraud for the last 18 years. He has fulfilled a number of roles during this time including fraud consultancy, Presales, Operational management and product development and has played a central role in the creation, development and launch of a range of Revenue Management products and services.
Will is regarded as an expert in Fraud Operations and has spoken many times on the International conference circuit on a wide range of subjects. In 2008, Will received an Outstanding Achievement Award from TUFF for his contribution to Telecommunications Fraud Management in the UK.

Managed Services – An important weapon in a telco’s arsenal for BSS business optimisation

While pressures on cost and margins with traditional services remain, fast emerging services are bringing in new risks and demands for new skills to manage them. Telcos are now looking for Managed Services engagements as a key differentiator in the emerging world.

 Telco’s are at the cross roads today – on one side they are pushing boundaries in a saturated and commoditized market to garner revenues and improve margins, whilst on the other they are pressurised to innovate and cater to the demands of the ubiquitous connectivity and data enabled services. Telco’s do not have a choice, but to act, to remain relevant in the market place with the changing landscape, new challenges and competition. With telco’s looking inwards for business optimisation – focusing primarily on the profitability of the business and monitoring the operational state of the business – what are the key trends shaping the industry and opportunity landscape ?

 Opportunities to remain relevant and successful in the new world order are plenty. Some of the initiatives are fairly quick to implement, while others require long term dedication and focus. Let us look at 3 key areas of opportunities in BSS for any telco.

  • OpEx control – Improving margins: The immediate and short-term opportunity for telcos is to control OpEx and improve margins on an already stressed traditional revenue streams. However, how do operators overcome the challenges facing them at two different levels – (a) skills upgrade (b) shortage of talented resources internally, and start improving their margins?
  • CapEx control – Improving RoIC: In the medium term, telcos are going to invest heavily in new and emerging technologies. The common conundrum corporate heads face are related to (a) successfully managing risks that comes with anything new (b) utilising the available critical capacity of technology & resources (c) responding timely & appropriately to market in face of competition and consumer expectations. How does Managed services help in providing the necessary capabilities to improve RoIC?
  • Economy of scale – Fuel growth: In the medium-longer term, telco leaders are going to look beyond their operating boundaries ; Industry consolidation, overseas M&A, new sources of revenue like PaaS/IaaS/SaaS for MVNOs or group op-co’s will be a key ingredient to the revenue growth. Is Managed services a viable solution to manage strategic and compliance risks?

Click here and download our latest newsletter in collaboration with Gartner for answers to the critical questions facing the industry leaders.

 

BSS/OSS Transformation – An Assailable Phase for Telcos

“Rapid” is an understatement to describe the pace at which the telecommunications industry is evolving. A vicious circle formed between the advancement of hardware capabilities and services offered to utilize these capabilities is probably what is causing this constant evolution. With such augmentation in the services offered, migrating to next-generation operations and billing systems is inevitable to operators. While the change is definitely a thumbs-up for telcos, the flip side is the challenges inherent to the transition phase itself.

Consider an expert chef in a successful restaurant offering a variety of dishes to customers. Quite obviously, his menu changes periodically to ensure that he caters to the constantly changing customers’ taste. While a changing menu keeps the restaurant and the chef in good business, it also brings in a big risk of cooking something unsavory in the process of creating something new. Though the chef is dexterous at what he does, it would always be a possibility that he would add that extra pinch of salt or sugar while trying out a new dish. Does this mean that the chef is not competent enough? Or should it stop the chef and the restaurant from offering newer dishes? The answer is “No”. It only goes to indicate that the transformation phase is highly vulnerable and needs to be dealt with extra caution to ensure continued success in the business.

Equating the above analogy to the telecom sector, one would understand that the chef is the telco and the new dishes are the variety of services offered to customers. The extra pinch of salt/sugar that we spoke about is the possible leakage or frauds that can hit telcos during the phase of BSS/OSS transformation.

A recent survey by KPMG indicates that 49% of the teclos undergoing transformation projects saw a significant increase in revenue leakage and threat of fraud while another 45% indicated a partial increase in revenue leakage and threat of fraud. Put together, a whopping 94% of operators have encountered some kind of increase in revenue leakages during the transformation phase.

Reasons for this vulnerability are quite straight forward. The controls that existed with a set process get disrupted and start to diminish once the transformation begins, thus leaving the operators in a bit of a handicap. Another main reason would be the significant loss of data that is an innate characteristic of transformation projects. This causes blind spots in the revenue chain and keeps telcos in the dark about the leakages occurring. To add to the telcos’ woes, transformation projects are not completed in a day’s work. They may stretch to anywhere between 2-10 years depending upon the size and type of operations.

All this points to one thing – with the breathtaking speed of change in the telecom sector,  telcos have to adapt quickly and decisively or else risk even greater leakage. Revenue Assurance processes need “greater than ever” emphasis during the transformation phase. After all, no one likes extra salt in their dishes; not even a pinch of it.

What kids can teach about Outsourcing??

Let’s deal with the difficult one first – Managed Services and outsourcing is here to stay and grow. So, what does this have to do with kids? Well nothing direct, except that kids can help resolve one of the biggest barriers to outsourcing – asking for HELP!

One thing I often notice, while meeting some of the prospects, is their reluctance to ask for help. The acknowledgement comes blatantly or subtly – there is a need to improve. The pressure of efficiency, productivity, reducing costs (or justifying with equal or exceeding returns) is mounting up on each one of them.  So, why hesitate to ask for help when there is a need? The top 3 inhibiting reasons are:

a)      Asking for help is considered a sign of weakness/failure

b)      Trust deficiency in the person who offers help

c)      Waiting for someone else to do it, so I cannot go wrong

There have been many management theories propounding kids’ psychology. Without surprise, it holds well when it comes to breaking these barriers too. Let me explain how, with typical kids’ perspective and how business could go about doing it.

Asking for help is a sign of weakness/failure

  • Kids view: Why? Why? Why? The ubiquitous question that drives every parent crazy is a Childs’ natural way to learn the world around her and develop cognitive skills. The kid sees it as an opportunity to be inquisitive, seek assistance (from someone who knows), learn something new and expand their horizon. The child doesn’t hesitate to ask for help  in its quest to face the world
  • Business way: Today while businesses appreciate hard work and diligence, they expect efficiency. Asking for help is a sure-fire way to achieve it. Seeking assistance is a fun way to solve a problem together and learn something new

  Trust deficiency

  • Kids view: Kids learn whom to trust and who not, either from the parents or slowly over a period of time
  • Business way: If past experience is something to go with and the trusted partner has delivered before, then entrust them with a new challenge. Else, if you are just starting, then start small, build confidence, before entrusting with bigger responsibilities

 Waiting for someone else to do it

  • Kids view: Walk into a classroom and ask for volunteers to try out something new – you will be amazed to see the numbers of tiny hands go up. Kids yearn for new things
  • Business way: Years of conditioning to be extremely risk averse has led to this state of mind. A well-planned and executed engagement will manage & mitigate the risks. Besides, many businesses have seen success the outsourcing way – there is enough precedence available. Go and get one for your benefit

After all, kids do continue to teach us a vital lesson or two…

Why do Telcos settle for less?

What makes a Telco settle for less? Is it the budget, fear of survival in a highly competitive market or knowledge and skill issues?

Bangladesh recently opened up the Interconnect landscape with 21 new ICX and 22 new IGW licensees entering the fray. This, without doubt, has fragmented the entire Interconnect market and has put significant pressure on the incumbents (to fight emerging competition) and for the new telcos (to have a viable business case for break even and eventually survive).

In a recently concluded InterConnect Conference at Bangladesh hosted by Subex, I had the opportunity to interact with a wide range of audience – CXOs, consultants & IT personnel. While it was acknowledged that a billing system is important to start the operations and convert “usage” to “cash”, it was evident from the discussions, that price was the driving factor in deciding a billing platform and to that end operators were scouting for “low cost” billing systems or looking at developing it in-house. Severe cash-flow issues, as the roll-out along with statutory payments to the regulator for obtaining and maintaining the license, was proving to be very costly. Hence cash-flow and total cost of ownership (TCO) were the main contributing factors to look at a low-cost billing option. The new telcos, in addition, were also exposed to the following risks:

  • Survival : Accurate and prompt billing will be a significant differentiating factor in the highly competitive market
  • Agility : As competition intensifies they need to be flexible to adapt to market needs and offer innovative products and services at the shortest possible time
  • Revenue leakages : Bangladesh as a market is highly prone to fraud and as per the regulator more than 10% of the revenue is lost due to illegal bypass

So, how are the telcos going to remain agile, competitive and eventually break-even at the shortest possible time? Do they have to settle for less and allow the forces of the market to dictate the future?

Subex unveiled a cloud offering for the Interconnect operators in the roadshow. It gives the best of both the worlds – low cost and superior technology, and help the telcos be ready for the future. The cloud model mitigates the business risks and provides the following benefits to the ICX and IGW:

  • Low cost of deployment & operations : With a TCO less than 30% of a licensed/in-house model and completely managed by experts, and CapEx requirement lesser by 50-60%
  • Low commitment : Volume based pricing to fit the business needs and scale as the business grows
  • Minimal risks : Easy sign-on and sign-off to the cloud model
  • Ready to launch: Pre-configured application requiring minimal customization (about 20%) to suit telco specific needs
  • Minimal domain knowledge: With service provider completely managing the core activities, knowledge and resource requirements from Telco are minimal. They are already constrained with resources and those can be used for growing their business
  • Flexibility : The cloud model can very easily extend into Revenue assurance, Fraud Management, Analytics for future

Naturally the excitement was evident when such an option was presented to the telco representatives. The only objection was around security (which was expected) and security is very easily addressable with the right technology and stringent processes.The “best-in-class” solution is available on a “best-in-class” service model which suits the pocket and addresses the business risks. It was time for the operators to go back and “relook” at their business case.

After all, when they have a great option, why do they have to settle for less?

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